The Rotten Lemon of Enlightenment


Creativity in my workplace

As much as I would love to study full-time the realities of life make this impossible. So when I’m not at university chasing my dream to be a visual artist I’m in an office processing masses of data and making maps for the oil industry. Which brings me to this awesome software we have helped test and develop for its creator (Dirstein and Fallon, 2011). I think it makes for a great case study for bringing in elements from different disciplines and industries to really revolutionise the way this industry looks and processes its data. It also makes for a great insight into coming up with amazingly creative ideas from existing technologies.

In the oil industry seismic data is collected and often displayed in 3D for the evaluation of coal and hydrocarbon exploration. To do this a geophysicist has to pick individual horizons which more often than not takes months to complete and only covers the zone of interest. This is where this software is great it enables the automated picking of all horizons in the dataset in hours or days at most. What is truly amazing and creative is how this software does this. It’s based on the Human Genome Project.

So what goes the Human Genome Project have to do with finding oil?

This is the really creative part. The developer saw that the waveforms from seismic data weren’t all that different from the human Chromosomes. Or at least they could be analysed as data in a very similar way. By matching similar waveforms the software is able to create horizons from the data. So without getting bogged down in the technique aspects I’ll leave it there, however I’ll attach a link to a .pdf file of a recent magazine article on the software and the extra work we do with it for those interested.

This illustrates a lot of the topics and ideas addressed so far in this unit.

  • To be always aware and have a genuine thirst for knowledge.
  • To look outside your field or profession for inspiration.
  • To entertain all ideas.
  • To take a risk or leap of faith and chase those ideas.
  • To surround yourself with people who stimulate you and your ideas.
  • To make it your passion.

It is really inspiring to be involved with these sorts of projects as they are dynamic and ever-changing. It’s like being invited on a journey of discovery. It’s also unhindered by established dogma and rules because whats around the corner is unknown. I find it all very exciting for it’s as much about the journey as the destination. It is for this reason I consider myself creative.

References

Dirstein, J.K. and Fallon, G.N. (2011, April). Automated interpretation of 3D seismic. Preview, issue 151, p30-37. Link to .pdf

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Creative Project #011
May 17, 2011, 9:01 pm
Filed under: CCA1103, Creative Project | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Wasn’t a big fan of my last attempt so had another crack tonight. I really like this version and think it works well as a whole. I opted to keep the left side photo quality to really draw the focus to the creative side. I think I managed to strike a good balance between recognisable and childlike.

What do you think?

Third time is a charm



Creative Project #010
May 15, 2011, 8:50 pm
Filed under: CCA1103, Creative Project | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Had another play around with the creative side tonight. Focused on getting the mark making right. Finding the right balance however is proving difficult. The orange marks I think work well though I will have to balance the colour on the right. The contour lines on the other hand look too sophisticated for my liking. I want it to be recognisable but still look as though it was drawn by a child.
 
Feedback is always welcome.

another portrait.



Creative Project #009

As I start to focus this project now would be a great time to start exploring its specific elements. Since I am drawing one side of the face in a childlike fashion it is only logical to start looking at drawings done by children. Here are a few I found and like using a google image search.

I really like the mark making especially with the pink and the crazy colours

Again the mark making in the green

The mark making in the blue is quiet beautiful

This time its the green but also the change in colour of the spikes on the dragons back. It's a strong decision.

Great use of colour and of course the mark making

Really like how the lines are different colours

 

References

 6a00d8341cc08553ef00e5540958078834-800wi (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://belladia.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/08/17/littlebirdiesmonsterdrawing.jpg

a (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_GjitsPnjV4w/SeSGs0HaBVI/AAAAAAAAAQo/msDTle9CFE4/s1600-h/a.jpg

d (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_GjitsPnjV4w/SeSGtaUpUqI/AAAAAAAAARA/EBLNakX2paU/s1600-h/d.jpg

kidpic1 (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://www.baggtheatre.co.uk/images/productions/milligan/kidpic1.jpg

kidpic2 (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://www.baggtheatre.co.uk/images/productions/milligan/kidpic2.jpg

 SDC11141 (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_GjitsPnjV4w/Sdn-bJ3H5DI/AAAAAAAAAPc/-LrBigy-8iM/s1600-h/SDC11141.jpg



Creative Project #008

A self-portrait based on Freud’s primary and secondary process using the concept that the right side of the brain is the creative side. The right side is the primary (childlike) process while the left is the secondary (adultlike) process. The primary being associated with creativity and therefore on the right side.
 

self portrait



Theories of Creativity

In preparation for my creative project and with the intention to make strong ties back to the unit I’ll be revising the readings and tutorial activities. I’ll be doing this with particular interest to how I can relate it back to my creative project. First up will be the Theories of Creativity (Davis, 2004).

Creativity is a hard thing to define as I believe it is a very personal experience that can be strongly influenced by the environment the individual finds themselves in. I think this is reinforced by the various theories in regards to creativity itself. All have a little truth to them for the masses but are likely true to the individual. What fits for them doesn’t always fit for others and just as what fits others doesn’t always fit them. For me it’s more about the bigger picture and picking what best suits you and your creativity. A good friend of mine didn’t want to share her ideas for a project in another unit which I found a little difficult to understand at first. Personally I like to share ideas freely and build on the ideas created by the ‘flow’ of the group. These new ideas excite me and push me to further build upon them privately. For reasons unknown to me this very thing I find helpful to my process could stifle hers. She could see it as a dilution of her ideas. However I digress, my point being that while these theories might not fit you perfectly they’ll help you understand your creativity and what works for you.

Sigmund Freud

First up is probably the most famous and controversial, Sigmund Freud‘s psychoanalytic account. Putting aside Freud’s obsession with sex he did have an interesting point about the primary and secondary processes. One that I could possibly relate back to my creative project. According to Freud our thinking process could be broken into two different categories; the primary and secondary processes. The primary being a childlike regression where the mind is free, relaxed and able to fantasize without restriction – an ideal environment to be creative. While the secondary is the adultlike way of thinking where reality and logic restrict our thinking. So I could in corporate a childlike element into my portrait for the right side. Maybe even dig up a childhood portrait of myself. I could also use crayons as the medium.

Ernst Kris

Ernst Kris worked closely with Freud before coming up with his own slightly modified version. Like Freud he was also focused on sex but felt aggression was an important factor too. What an interesting pair these two would have made! Kris believe creativity was a preconscious activity and therefore ideas just happen as an “Eureka” moment and had very little to do with conscious thought. I couldn’t disagree more so on to the next!

Lawrence Kubie

Lawrence Kubie breaks down creativity into three states; the conscious, preconscious and unconscious. He claims the conscious and unconscious are rigid and uncreative. The conscious anchored in reality while the unconscious is vague and meanings hidden or repressed. However through various techniques you can reach the threshold between the two and understand the unconscious while remaining in a conscious state. It is the ability of the individual to access this state (preconscious) that determines their creativity. Another theory I don’t agree with personally. I believe we have a more active role in our ability to create than Kubie gives us credit for.

Harold Rugg

Harold Rugg ‘s theory although basically the same as Kubie’s does have one important difference that make’s it more feasible in my opinion. That the preconscious is a more easily attainable state than what Kubie would have us believe. Much like Freud and his theories on primary and secondary thinking the preconscious is the childlike state and the conscious is the adultlike state. The preconscious state brings the ideas to life while the conscious state brings them to reality.

To be continued…

References

Davis, G. A. (2004). Definitions and Theories. Creativity is forever (pp. 58-73). (5th Ed.). USA: Kendell/Hunt. Download .pdf handout

Ernst%20Kris (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 10, 2011, from; http://www.apsa.org/centennialstatic/Notable%20Psychoanalysts/Ernst%20Kris.jpg

HaroldRugg (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 10, 2011, from; http://www.sandiegoyesterday.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/HaroldRugg.jpg

Lawrence%20Kubie (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 10, 2011, from; http://www.apsa.org/centennialstatic/Notable%20Psychoanalysts/Lawrence%20Kubie.jpg

sigmund-freud-med (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 10, 2011, from; http://www.nndb.com/people/736/000029649/sigmund-freud-med.jpg



Creative Project #007

I got some feedback from the class and Mark yesterday in regards to my creative project. I have been bouncing between two different concepts for a while now and not really making much progress. I really liked Nina‘s suggestion of somehow combining the two together. So will be looking at ways to animate the right side of the face to illustrate my creative self. Will start revising the various class handouts and worksheets for inspiration. Finally feels like I have direction again! I have discovered over the course of this unit that being able to bounce ideas around with others is an integral part of my creative process. I need immediate feedback to help my ‘flow’ get moving again when it starts to get stagnate.
 
With all this in mind I wanted to take my project away from standard photography portraits. So the series of portraits was scraped for one self-portrait that was taken two years ago. This I feel takes away the importance of the photo itself in the work. I also really wanted to push my technical skills with this project so decided it was time to finally give my drawing tablet a proper workout. Being a Visual Arts major I wanted the look and feel of the visual arts but the ease of working with digital media. Will also come in handy with the animation side of things I hope.
 
Here is the process I took to turn my photo into a “painting” without actually painting. Early stages so may rework it depending were I decide to go from here.
 
As always feedback is welcome and appreciated. Enjoy!
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Original image

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Getting the base colours down

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Using a brush tool

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Black background

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Finished(?) left side