The Rotten Lemon of Enlightenment


Spoors vs Religon

This week’s lecture by Dr Glen Spoors on Mythopoesis was…well…different. Like his last lecture the rate of information being thrown at you was quite overbearing but at the same time extremely interesting. I found myself constantly drifting away from the presented material and fixating on Spoors’s rather odd childhood understanding of the world. He was basically left to discover and figure out the world himself with very little outside guidance. With an extremely active imagination even by a child’s standards is it really any wonder that he came up with a very fantastical world view?

Spoors, G (2011) stated on several occasions that his family wasn’t religious and was I assume, brought up without the teachings of any religion. I find this of particular interest as while I do not believe in any religion I was brought up on christian beliefs. Would Spoors’s world understanding been different if he had been brought up with a religious background? I have always been of the belief that religions are more trouble than they are worth but for the first time I began to wonder and challenge that idea. Religions basically help people understand their purpose, place, how the world functions and even how it came about. Which is exactly what Spoors seemed to be missing and compensating for. Without these stories to explain the world he simply came up with his own. Not all of which turned out to be healthy. At the time however they made sense and helped him deal with the complexities of life. So would Spoor’s childhood been any different if religion was involved? Let’s face it Religion is a lot more interesting to a child with Gods and superpowers than science and monkeys! It is also in a nice little package. I one stop shop so to speak.

This is all very speculative and just my opinion but it did keep me thinking well after the lecture had finished.

Would be really interesting to hear others thoughts on the subject.

References

Spoors, G (2011). Glen Spoors – Mythopoesis
https://jmdirstein.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/week_5_mythopoesis.pdf

Religion-The-Creation-of-Man. (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved April 6, 2011, from; http://religion.lilithezine.com/images/Religion-The-Creation-of-Man.jpg

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Creative Process Illustrated

Found some great videos on youtube about how people in the creative industries come up with their ideas. They were very insightful, reinforcing the importance of understanding the creative process and how best to encourage it.


It’s always interesting to learn the source of any idea, concept or product. Nothing is ever created from a vacuum void of information. Some of the coolest ideas come from just putting A and B together or even P and Y.


Found it interesting how they re-worked the brief inhouse to get the most out of it. The constant circulation of ideas through the creative team is also worth mentioning. It’s not always the quality of the idea that’s important but where it might lead.


Really liked the point they made about being in the zone and working around it for maximum effect.

References

YTShowandTell. (2010). Creative Process Illustrated: Benjamin Palmer . Retrieved Mar 30, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD457Dr1jx0

YTShowandTell. (2010). Creative Process Illustrated: Eric Kallman and Craig Allen of W+K . Retrieved Mar 30, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD457Dr1jx0  

YTShowandTell. (2010). Creative Process Illustrated: Terrence Kelleman . Retrieved Mar 30, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD457Dr1jx0



Creative Project #001

The creative process which I have talked about in the post Understanding your creativity: Preparation is being constantly aware of your environment. While categorising this information and applying it to your own ideas and concepts. With this in mind I stumble across this video on another wordpress blog and an idea was born!

What a great way to document the evolution of an idea from concept to final outcome. Or better yet what a great way to illustrate the creative process itself! My creative project might just very well be my own personal creative process come to life in the form of a stop motion animation video. Whether this will be a viable idea I’m not sure but as week three’s lecturer Harman, J. (2011) stated “entertain all ideas” no matter what your initial thoughts and feels are towards it. You never know where it might take you!

 

References

Harman, J. (2011) Personal Creative Process: John Harman.
http://sandbox.ea.ecu.edu.au/staffuse/mtmcmaho/CCA1103/CCA1103L3/index.html

The Graphic Side of Life
http://graphicsideoflife.wordpress.com/



Understanding your creativity: Preparation

It’s important for anyone in the Creative Industries to understand their own creative process. I’ve already talked in previous posts about the Five Rules of Creativity and how closely they match my process.

Here are Harman, J. (2011)’s rules again as a reminder.

  1. Preparation
  2. Concentration
  3. Incubation
  4. Illumination
  5. Verification

By understanding your own process you are able to map out what limits and what encourages your creativity. In this post I have mapped out the Preparation stage in the diagram below. I call it “Birth of an Idea”. 

How ideas are made

What this diagram does is draw focus on important elements within the process itself. For me the key is how the mind processes and categorizes external information. For me it seems perception plays a pivotal role in the early stages of my creative process. Anything that alters or influences this will have a significant impact of the quantity and quality of my ideas before they have even been formed.

I personally have experimented with drugs (shocking I know) and have taken various medications. All of which have altered my ability to perceive in some way or another. I found with party drugs my perception would often focus on the obscure and irrelevant. More importantly however I noticed that very little of the information was ever processed and categorized. On the flip side I found medications killed my curiosity and therefore the amount of information I processed was also greatly reduced.

I’m not saying all my ideas dried up or were bad because I still was able to create some amazing work. I do however believe it was very restrictive and had an overall negative effect. I was basically handicapping my creativity at the earliest stages. A balance is key and with a clear perception you are really giving yourself the best possible chance to create and do your best work!

References

Harman, J. (2011) Personal Creative Process: John Harman. http://sandbox.ea.ecu.edu.au/staffuse/mtmcmaho/CCA1103/CCA1103L3



History of Creativity

Last weeks lecture was entitled “Creativity: A Historical Overview” and presented by Glen Spoors. Despite the early starting time and taking my seat mere seconds before the lecture began I was hooked instantly. A lot of information was covered in the short hour and was thoroughly engaging. It will be a tough act to follow! I have attached the download of the lecture made available by the SCA website in the references for this post.

“Creativity: A Historical Overview” is a lecture you really don’t appreciate until several days after it was given. You know it’s good and there was great information within but due to the vast amount of information and the early hour you stagger out wondering what just happened. Kind of like a heavy night out on the drink and waking up the next morning trying to remember if that was the best night of your life or that you had in fact been violated in some way… It’s not until after the emotional rollercoaster of trying to process all that information you realise how profound it was. An odd combination of relief that some of that information stuck (you hadn’t been violated) and the satisfaction that it added to your understanding of the world around you (it was the greatest night of your life and you have photos to prove it!).

There was a particular moment for me this week when I felt the slap of understanding as the information began to settled and find its place. It came while reading Franco’s post “Creative Schmative – Why is creativity important?“. I always find it amazing how subjective we are as human beings and the vast amounts of simular and more often than not completely different meanings we generate from the same situation. So why should creativity be any different? Spoors, G. (2011) illustrates this in his lecture through the various stages of human history and the art from these periods. What is of particular interest however is the ever changing driving forces behind the art and its effects on what it is to be considered creative. From the organic and primal sculptures of the statues of “Venus” which have been found all over the world to the precise and mathmatical representations of the human form in Ancient Egypt.

The Venus of Willendorf

The Venus of Willendorf is a statue of the female form. Simular statues have been found all over the world suggesting all primitive humans shared simular cultural values.

Egyptian Art - Ramses I - Egyptian/Mythology

The Eygptian representation of the human form remained the same for over 3000 years and was based on a grid system.

Both represent the ideals and values of their respective cultures at the time they were created. One could argue creativity is therefore subjective by nature and ultimately being defined by the context of the age. Today it is being shaped by our technology based and consumer obsessed society. When pop culture rules and everyone is looking for the next new and exciting fad creativity is just doing what it has always done. Representing the driving forces behind the culture of the time.

What it is to be creative in 100 years time is anyone guess…

References

Spoors,G. (2011) Creativity:An Historical Overview. Download here cca1103_week_2_lecture

willendorf-large. (n.d) In Bing Images [Digital image]. Retrieved March 15, 2011, from; http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=venus&view=detail&id=E006F95AD06B3FB724BA4EC3ED5D7BE3C2124059&first=61&FORM=IDFRIR&qpvt=venus

egyptian_art_ramses_i. (n.d) In Bing Images [Digital image]. Retrieved March 15, 2011, from; http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=egyptian+art&view=detail&id=8E6A97065E5BA359B543242FE723EF2B2923C6A3&first=1&FORM=IDFRIR