The Rotten Lemon of Enlightenment


Photomedia and the Creative Personality

sleeping

Who said being a student was easy!

 

This week’s lecture by Juha Tolonen entitled Photomedia was in one word… bad. I guess it was inevitable when considering the quality of the last two lectures that something had to give. Last semester I did CMM1108 and Jung. J (2010) gave some very good advice in regard to presentations; “You’ll be lucky if the audience remembers one thing from your presentation”. This advice really helps the presenter focus their presentation and really emphasises the need for clear points. Juha’s had neither. I found myself wondering the entire time where is this going and more importantly what did he want me to take away from it? So much so when we were asked if we had any questions at the end I was tempted to ask that very question. I chose not to because I didn’t want to come across as being a smart ass or embarrass Juha as that wasn’t my intention. It was obvious he struggled with today’s lecture so there was no need to remind him of that in front of a hundred or so students. What I would have liked to see was more of his creative process and how it applied to his work. Much like a case study he could have taken us through a body of work from idea/concept to final works or exhibition. That’s assuming he was aware of his creative process in the first place which doesn’t always seem to be the case with creative types. With a clear focus I think Juha could really turn this presentation into something special but as is it was a bit of a disaster!

References

Jung. J (2010) CMM1108 – Communication and Digital Technology

Tolonen, J. (2011) Photomedia
https://jmdirstein.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/juha_tolonenlq.pdf

sleeping. (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved March 25, 2011, from; http://www.lalalalaurenlikes.blogspot.com/



Understanding your creativity: Preparation

It’s important for anyone in the Creative Industries to understand their own creative process. I’ve already talked in previous posts about the Five Rules of Creativity and how closely they match my process.

Here are Harman, J. (2011)’s rules again as a reminder.

  1. Preparation
  2. Concentration
  3. Incubation
  4. Illumination
  5. Verification

By understanding your own process you are able to map out what limits and what encourages your creativity. In this post I have mapped out the Preparation stage in the diagram below. I call it “Birth of an Idea”. 

How ideas are made

What this diagram does is draw focus on important elements within the process itself. For me the key is how the mind processes and categorizes external information. For me it seems perception plays a pivotal role in the early stages of my creative process. Anything that alters or influences this will have a significant impact of the quantity and quality of my ideas before they have even been formed.

I personally have experimented with drugs (shocking I know) and have taken various medications. All of which have altered my ability to perceive in some way or another. I found with party drugs my perception would often focus on the obscure and irrelevant. More importantly however I noticed that very little of the information was ever processed and categorized. On the flip side I found medications killed my curiosity and therefore the amount of information I processed was also greatly reduced.

I’m not saying all my ideas dried up or were bad because I still was able to create some amazing work. I do however believe it was very restrictive and had an overall negative effect. I was basically handicapping my creativity at the earliest stages. A balance is key and with a clear perception you are really giving yourself the best possible chance to create and do your best work!

References

Harman, J. (2011) Personal Creative Process: John Harman. http://sandbox.ea.ecu.edu.au/staffuse/mtmcmaho/CCA1103/CCA1103L3