The Rotten Lemon of Enlightenment


Presentations = way too much stress :S

What a crazy day its been today!

For the first time in a month I arrived early to a lecture with time to spare. Even arriving before my good friend Franco, though I am not sure if he was genuinely surprised or resented me for making him look late. Then again it could have had something to do with my continuous gloating and declaration that he shouldn’t have even bothered to come in this morning. After about ten minutes of relentless badgering Franco was rescued as Erin Coates began her lecture.

I had been looking forward to this lecture since seeing the unit schedule for the first time. Mostly because it was specific to my area of expertise; the Visual Arts. Erin Coates’s lecture Visual Arts and Creativity was a great insight into her work but more importantly her creative process. I’ll also point out that I really liked her art and will be heading down to the Fremantle Arts Centre to check out the Chinese Video Art exhibition she is involved in.

As the theories and ideas of the creative process start to sink in it was great to be able to not only see them in Erin’s practice but to start to understand why they work. My notes during the lecture started to shift from documenting the presentation itself to focus on the elements she draws upon from the theories we have been learning. Here are some of the examples Coates, E (2011) gave;

  • …every experience shapes you…
  • …be resourceful…
  • …try something new. try new mediums…
  • …draw all the time…
  • …record what you are thinking…
  • …be a collector of information…
  • …avid researcher…
  • …passionate, rigorous…

I felt these statements really fit in strongly with the idea that the creative mind is always collecting and cataloging information for later reference. For me this cuts to the very core of creativity and something that should be nurtured. This revelation just isn’t specific to this lecture but more the cumulation of the last three.

With the lecture over I would generally continue bugging Franco but today was different…we had our presentation!

Formal presentations have always terrified me. I can get up and talk about my artwork or man a booth at an oil conference no worries but the moment it becomes a structured, formal presentation the wheels fall off. Following those set points one after the other doesn’t feel natural, especially when thinking about the next point. It always messes up your train of though as you try in vain to get the current point across. I really struggle if I have to keep it linear. Maybe my understanding that a formal presentation has to be smooth and linear is unrealistic. Or I worry about the overall message of the presentation and not let the points do the talking. The fear that it won’t run smoothly or the pressure not to let your group members down. What I do know is when I sat down again it was like walking out of my last TEE exam. The relief was so great I have been in the best mood all night. Which is crazy considering I have been stressed all week over reading three pages in front of sixteen people for about five minutes. The worst part being I would have probably done a runner if I wasn’t in a group! The mind is an amazing thing!

Thank god it’s friday and I won’t be doing that again for a very long time…I hope!

References

Coates, E. (2011). Visual Arts and Creativity
Download .pdf

haunted-house. (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved April 8, 2011, from; http://segmentnext.com/wp-content/uploads/haunted-house.jpg



Creative Process Illustrated

Found some great videos on youtube about how people in the creative industries come up with their ideas. They were very insightful, reinforcing the importance of understanding the creative process and how best to encourage it.


It’s always interesting to learn the source of any idea, concept or product. Nothing is ever created from a vacuum void of information. Some of the coolest ideas come from just putting A and B together or even P and Y.


Found it interesting how they re-worked the brief inhouse to get the most out of it. The constant circulation of ideas through the creative team is also worth mentioning. It’s not always the quality of the idea that’s important but where it might lead.


Really liked the point they made about being in the zone and working around it for maximum effect.

References

YTShowandTell. (2010). Creative Process Illustrated: Benjamin Palmer . Retrieved Mar 30, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD457Dr1jx0

YTShowandTell. (2010). Creative Process Illustrated: Eric Kallman and Craig Allen of W+K . Retrieved Mar 30, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD457Dr1jx0  

YTShowandTell. (2010). Creative Process Illustrated: Terrence Kelleman . Retrieved Mar 30, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD457Dr1jx0



Creative Project #001

The creative process which I have talked about in the post Understanding your creativity: Preparation is being constantly aware of your environment. While categorising this information and applying it to your own ideas and concepts. With this in mind I stumble across this video on another wordpress blog and an idea was born!

What a great way to document the evolution of an idea from concept to final outcome. Or better yet what a great way to illustrate the creative process itself! My creative project might just very well be my own personal creative process come to life in the form of a stop motion animation video. Whether this will be a viable idea I’m not sure but as week three’s lecturer Harman, J. (2011) stated “entertain all ideas” no matter what your initial thoughts and feels are towards it. You never know where it might take you!

 

References

Harman, J. (2011) Personal Creative Process: John Harman.
http://sandbox.ea.ecu.edu.au/staffuse/mtmcmaho/CCA1103/CCA1103L3/index.html

The Graphic Side of Life
http://graphicsideoflife.wordpress.com/