The Rotten Lemon of Enlightenment


Creating a creative atmosphere

In week six for our tutorial on creative environments, there was a particular activity that caught my eye on the handout (Tutorial Activites, 2010).

Begin to consider the ways in which you might create an “atmosphere” of creativity (for example, using lighting and images, or activities such as chanting, arranging objects, improvising lyrics to bongo rhythms – whatever you can think of).

In your own time, try to create an “atmosphere” of creativity using some of the techniques discussed, and report on the relationship between the altered environment, your altered mental state, and your subsequent thought processes and creative activity.

Now that I have had some time to think about and experiment with this I have come to some conclusions. The most important being that your creative atmosphere should reflect who you are. Personally I thrive on organised chaos and only rein it in when it starts to unravel. My filing system is the floor, I forgot what my desk looked like a long time ago and I make my bed once a week when I change the sheets. Sure most people see this as dirty but it’s really just messy. There is a difference…right?

So what does this have to do with my creative atmosphere?

After considering for some time as to why I am by nature a messy person I began to realise that it was exactly how I think. I file things on the floor so they are easy to access. When I put them away and out of sight I feel they become forgotten. Just as when I have an idea or see something interesting I make a mental note and keep it at the forefront of my mind. I need to keep things I consider important within reach. So in regards to my creative atmosphere as a physical space or studio I need to be able to see all the items, tools, materials, books and information for the particular project I am working on. One of the reasons I don’t make my bed everyday is because by leaving it unmade it feels as if I had never left. I don’t have to toss and turn to get comfortable because it feels familiar. It allows me to just focus on going to sleep. Which is the exact same atmosphere I tried to recreate. One that syncs perfectly with my though process so I can focus on creating and not trying to force it.

I also have strong internal dialogue that clashes with any external dialogue. So if  there is music it cannot have lyrics. I tend to listen to ambient music with brain waves played through the speakers if I choose to listen to anything at all. Complete silence is preferred as distraction is often met with frustration. It’s not until the tasks become less mentally challenging that music and conversation with others creep back in.

When I create I generally like to be alone. It enables me to be myself and removes any sense of self-consciousness and doubt. Many of the stages of the creative process I find to be intensely personal or extremely social. The social and interactive part coming during the formation of ideas and criticism of work when requested.

Finally the exclusion of clocks within eyesight. By excluding time from the process, that connection to reality is severed and I can completely immerse myself in my work.

By creating an environment that reflects my personality I was able to enhance my creative process. In a comfortable and familiar atmosphere it was easier to slip into a creative flow and maintain it. Much like returning to an unmade bed and feeling like you never left.

References

Tutorial Activites. (2010). sccaOnline | CCA1103. Retrieved from https://lms.sca.ecu.edu.au/units/CCA1103/workshops/cca1103_activities_2010_2_w6.pdf 
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