The Rotten Lemon of Enlightenment


“…and from the stank of rotten fruit I shall return” – Me, I said that.
December 8, 2011, 1:52 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

As it was prophesied in this doodle it has come to be

It’s been a while. Six months to be exact. Lots of things have happened since the completion of the unit this blog was created for. Holidays were had. A new semester was taken and completed. So what’s next for the ‘rotten lemon’? To be honest I’m not entirely sure. All I know is I had a bunch of fun writing this and now that university is over for another year I find myself with more time on my hands. I’ve been listening to this audio book that suggests engaging in an activity that plays to your personal character strenghts increases your overall happiness. As creativity is the strenght I am looking endulge here it will be the overall theme of the blog. Ranging from art to cool ideas, theories or whatever tickles my fancy all in the name of enlightenment. So stay tuned and enjoy the ride as I try to make sense of this crazy world of ours.

 



Creativity in my workplace

As much as I would love to study full-time the realities of life make this impossible. So when I’m not at university chasing my dream to be a visual artist I’m in an office processing masses of data and making maps for the oil industry. Which brings me to this awesome software we have helped test and develop for its creator (Dirstein and Fallon, 2011). I think it makes for a great case study for bringing in elements from different disciplines and industries to really revolutionise the way this industry looks and processes its data. It also makes for a great insight into coming up with amazingly creative ideas from existing technologies.

In the oil industry seismic data is collected and often displayed in 3D for the evaluation of coal and hydrocarbon exploration. To do this a geophysicist has to pick individual horizons which more often than not takes months to complete and only covers the zone of interest. This is where this software is great it enables the automated picking of all horizons in the dataset in hours or days at most. What is truly amazing and creative is how this software does this. It’s based on the Human Genome Project.

So what goes the Human Genome Project have to do with finding oil?

This is the really creative part. The developer saw that the waveforms from seismic data weren’t all that different from the human Chromosomes. Or at least they could be analysed as data in a very similar way. By matching similar waveforms the software is able to create horizons from the data. So without getting bogged down in the technique aspects I’ll leave it there, however I’ll attach a link to a .pdf file of a recent magazine article on the software and the extra work we do with it for those interested.

This illustrates a lot of the topics and ideas addressed so far in this unit.

  • To be always aware and have a genuine thirst for knowledge.
  • To look outside your field or profession for inspiration.
  • To entertain all ideas.
  • To take a risk or leap of faith and chase those ideas.
  • To surround yourself with people who stimulate you and your ideas.
  • To make it your passion.

It is really inspiring to be involved with these sorts of projects as they are dynamic and ever-changing. It’s like being invited on a journey of discovery. It’s also unhindered by established dogma and rules because whats around the corner is unknown. I find it all very exciting for it’s as much about the journey as the destination. It is for this reason I consider myself creative.

References

Dirstein, J.K. and Fallon, G.N. (2011, April). Automated interpretation of 3D seismic. Preview, issue 151, p30-37. Link to .pdf



Creative Project #011
May 17, 2011, 9:01 pm
Filed under: CCA1103, Creative Project | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Wasn’t a big fan of my last attempt so had another crack tonight. I really like this version and think it works well as a whole. I opted to keep the left side photo quality to really draw the focus to the creative side. I think I managed to strike a good balance between recognisable and childlike.

What do you think?

Third time is a charm



Creating a creative atmosphere

In week six for our tutorial on creative environments, there was a particular activity that caught my eye on the handout (Tutorial Activites, 2010).

Begin to consider the ways in which you might create an “atmosphere” of creativity (for example, using lighting and images, or activities such as chanting, arranging objects, improvising lyrics to bongo rhythms – whatever you can think of).

In your own time, try to create an “atmosphere” of creativity using some of the techniques discussed, and report on the relationship between the altered environment, your altered mental state, and your subsequent thought processes and creative activity.

Now that I have had some time to think about and experiment with this I have come to some conclusions. The most important being that your creative atmosphere should reflect who you are. Personally I thrive on organised chaos and only rein it in when it starts to unravel. My filing system is the floor, I forgot what my desk looked like a long time ago and I make my bed once a week when I change the sheets. Sure most people see this as dirty but it’s really just messy. There is a difference…right?

So what does this have to do with my creative atmosphere?

After considering for some time as to why I am by nature a messy person I began to realise that it was exactly how I think. I file things on the floor so they are easy to access. When I put them away and out of sight I feel they become forgotten. Just as when I have an idea or see something interesting I make a mental note and keep it at the forefront of my mind. I need to keep things I consider important within reach. So in regards to my creative atmosphere as a physical space or studio I need to be able to see all the items, tools, materials, books and information for the particular project I am working on. One of the reasons I don’t make my bed everyday is because by leaving it unmade it feels as if I had never left. I don’t have to toss and turn to get comfortable because it feels familiar. It allows me to just focus on going to sleep. Which is the exact same atmosphere I tried to recreate. One that syncs perfectly with my though process so I can focus on creating and not trying to force it.

I also have strong internal dialogue that clashes with any external dialogue. So if  there is music it cannot have lyrics. I tend to listen to ambient music with brain waves played through the speakers if I choose to listen to anything at all. Complete silence is preferred as distraction is often met with frustration. It’s not until the tasks become less mentally challenging that music and conversation with others creep back in.

When I create I generally like to be alone. It enables me to be myself and removes any sense of self-consciousness and doubt. Many of the stages of the creative process I find to be intensely personal or extremely social. The social and interactive part coming during the formation of ideas and criticism of work when requested.

Finally the exclusion of clocks within eyesight. By excluding time from the process, that connection to reality is severed and I can completely immerse myself in my work.

By creating an environment that reflects my personality I was able to enhance my creative process. In a comfortable and familiar atmosphere it was easier to slip into a creative flow and maintain it. Much like returning to an unmade bed and feeling like you never left.

References

Tutorial Activites. (2010). sccaOnline | CCA1103. Retrieved from https://lms.sca.ecu.edu.au/units/CCA1103/workshops/cca1103_activities_2010_2_w6.pdf 
Download .pdf



Creative Project #010
May 15, 2011, 8:50 pm
Filed under: CCA1103, Creative Project | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Had another play around with the creative side tonight. Focused on getting the mark making right. Finding the right balance however is proving difficult. The orange marks I think work well though I will have to balance the colour on the right. The contour lines on the other hand look too sophisticated for my liking. I want it to be recognisable but still look as though it was drawn by a child.
 
Feedback is always welcome.

another portrait.



The six thinking hats
May 14, 2011, 9:31 pm
Filed under: CCA1103, The six posts for Mark, Tutorial | Tags: , , , , , , ,

The six thinking hats (De Bono,1992) is a technique that has seen considerable popularity in the business world as a way to separate ego from performance. Thinking by nature is a deeply personal and subjective process so it’s not surprising that we become quite attached to our ideas. With this technique teams are able to address problems, ideas, etc in a objective manner. They are able to see the topic from different angles. As the group moves through the various hats the conversation is allowed to run it’s course without resistance or descending into the the inevitable argument.

The six hats are as follows;

The white hat is all about research. It’s the collecting of all relevant information.

The red hat is emotion. Your gut feeling. Your intuitions.

The black hat is reality and caution. Risk management.

The yellow hat tries to address the issues brought up by the black hat. It’s the optimistic look at all the possible benefits.

The green hat is the creative hat. Dedicated time put aside to be creative. Allowing time for creativity is not a natural thing. Just as positive thinking towards an idea we do not like is not natural.

The blue hat is about the big picture. After going through all the hats is it still viable. What is the verdict.

So this is all well and good in the boardroom but how about the individual? These hats represent behaviors that are in all of us. However, some hats are more dominant than others depending on the individual. With this technique you are able to take a more even and systematic approach to your thinking process. Enabling a more balanced approach to your creative process.

References

De Bono, E. (1992). Six thinking hats. Serious Creativity (pp. 77-85). New York: HarperBusiness.
Download .pdf



Creative Project #009

As I start to focus this project now would be a great time to start exploring its specific elements. Since I am drawing one side of the face in a childlike fashion it is only logical to start looking at drawings done by children. Here are a few I found and like using a google image search.

I really like the mark making especially with the pink and the crazy colours

Again the mark making in the green

The mark making in the blue is quiet beautiful

This time its the green but also the change in colour of the spikes on the dragons back. It's a strong decision.

Great use of colour and of course the mark making

Really like how the lines are different colours

 

References

 6a00d8341cc08553ef00e5540958078834-800wi (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://belladia.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/08/17/littlebirdiesmonsterdrawing.jpg

a (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_GjitsPnjV4w/SeSGs0HaBVI/AAAAAAAAAQo/msDTle9CFE4/s1600-h/a.jpg

d (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_GjitsPnjV4w/SeSGtaUpUqI/AAAAAAAAARA/EBLNakX2paU/s1600-h/d.jpg

kidpic1 (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://www.baggtheatre.co.uk/images/productions/milligan/kidpic1.jpg

kidpic2 (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://www.baggtheatre.co.uk/images/productions/milligan/kidpic2.jpg

 SDC11141 (n.d) In Google Images [Digital image]. Retrieved May 9, 2011, from; http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_GjitsPnjV4w/Sdn-bJ3H5DI/AAAAAAAAAPc/-LrBigy-8iM/s1600-h/SDC11141.jpg




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